Introduction to Building Trust

Definition(s)/Description  

“Trust impacts us 24/7, 365 days a year. It undergirds and affects the quality of every relationship, every communication, every work project, every business venture, every effort in which we are engaged. Contrary to what most people believe, trust is not some soft, illusive quality that you either have or you don’t; rather, trust is a pragmatic, tangible, actionable asset that you can create – much faster than you think possible. I am also convinced in every situation, nothing is as fast as the speed of trust. And, contrary to popular belief, trust is something you can do something about. In fact, you can get good at creating it.”  Stephen M. Covey

The Speed of Trust model created by Stephen M. Covey consists of five levels of trust: self-trust, relationship trust, organizational trust, market trust and societal trust. Self-trust is constructed on two pillars: Character and Competence. Two key elements of character essential in building trust are intent manifested in caring, transparency and openness and integrity manifested as honesty, fairness, and authenticity. Two key elements of competence are capability demonstrated through skills, knowledge and experience, and results demonstrated through one’s record, credibility and performance. Relationship trust is built on a foundation of self-trust and how you and others behave in your interactions. What you do matters more than what you say.  Organizational trust is gained through alignment – having the organization’s systems, structures and rewards aligned with one consistent objective.When everything is aligned well, trust grows. Market trust is driven by your organization’s reputation which is earned by applying the four core elements at the organizational and market levels. Societal trust is when you create value for others and for society at large through meaningful contributions – giving back instead of taking.

  • Character: Two key elements of character essential in building trust are intent (do you have a hidden agenda?) manifested in caring, transparency and openness and integrity (do you do what you say?) manifested as honesty, fairness, and authenticity. (Covey, 2008)

Competence: Two key elements of competence are capability (are your abilities relevant?) demonstrated through skills, knowledge and experience, and results (what’s your track record?) demonstrated through one’s record, credibility and performance. (Covey, 2008)

The following skills, when applied thoughtfully and intentionally, help to build trust.

  • Talk straight: Always be honest and upfront about what you are thinking. Tell the truth and let people know where you stand. (Covey, 2008)
  • Show respect: Respect the dignity and feelings of everyone you come into contact with. Treat everyone evenhandedly. Show kindness in your interactions. (Covey, 2008)
  • Be transparent: Be completely open about the facts. Tell the truth in ways people can verify for themselves. Err on the side of telling too much rather than too little. (Covey, 2008)
  • Right wrongs: When you end up being wrong, work very hard to make things right. Acknowledge your errors, apologize and make restitution where possible. (Covey, 2008)
  • Show loyalty: Always give credit where credit is due. Acknowledge the input and contributions of others. Speak about people as if they were always present and avoid criticizing. (Covey, 2008)
  • Deliver results: Establish a track record of getting the right things done. Be proactive in making things happen rather than letting everything move along with its own momentum. Do what you were hired to do. (Covey, 2008)
  • Get better: Keep developing your personal capabilities by continuing to learn more. Seek formal and informal feedback that will let you know how you’re doing and act on the feedback you receive. Assume you will always need to improve your capabilities to meet tomorrow’s challenges. (Covey, 2008)
  • Confront reality: Address tough issues and acknowledge what is unsaid. Be courageous in your conversations. Don’t skirt real issues- dive into them directly and openly. Don’t be afraid to deliver bad news. (Covey, 2008)
  • State expectations: Clearly define and discuss your expectations. Form clear agreements on what is realistic and validate your intermediate results to ensure there is common understanding and alignment. Renegotiate outputs earlier rather than later, if necessary. (Covey, 2008)
  • Be accountable: Accept that the buck stops with you. Hold yourself just as accountable as you want to hold others for the good, the bad and the ugly. Create agreements with set reporting requirements and keep to them. Don’t blame others when things go wrong. (Covey, 2008)
  • Listen first: Listen before you speak and try to understand what’s being said with empathy. Never assume you have all the answers. Ask lots of questions and seek clarifications. (Covey, 2008)
  • Meet commitments: Say what you’re going to do and then do it. Be careful and deliberate about what you commit to. Never break a confidence. Make your word ironclad. (Covey, 2008)
  • Extend trust: Extend trust abundantly to those who have earned it. Extend it conditionally to those who are still in the process of earning it. Err on the side of being too trusting.  Make learning how to extend trust a priority because to be trusted yourself, you have to learn how to trust others (“smart trust”). (Covey, 2008)
  • Restore trust: When trust has been lost, you can restore it with time and possibly some pain. When restoring your trust in others, don’t be too quick to judge- give others the benefit of the doubt and provide opportunities to restore trust. Forgive and let go of vindictiveness. If you’ve lost the trust of someone else, work hard to improve your character and enhance your competency to behave in ways that inspire trust.
  • Tool name: Description of the tool with link to page that describes the tool in more detail and provides instructions on how to use it.

Tool name: Description of the tool with link to page that describes the tool in more detail and provides instructions on how to use it.

  • Name of example: Description of the example with link to page that illustrates the example. The example page will include links to relevant resources on models/frameworks, attributes, skills and tools.

 

Video

Start the building trust journey today!

Building Trust Resources

Prev 1 of 16 Next
Prev 1 of 16 Next

Main Forum
 
Notifications
Clear all

Main Forum

This is a simple parent forum

No topics were found here

Share:

What do successful grads think you should study?

March 16th, 2016|Comments Off on What do successful grads think you should study?

Learn to think smart. Etiam consectetur odio erat, quis mattis leo vestibulum non. Fusce ex ligula, tristique quis finibus sed, placerat sed libero. Phasellus convallis, sem ac tristique interdum, purus purus vehicula quam, ut fermentum [...]

Former student discusses success in the fashion industry

March 15th, 2016|Comments Off on Former student discusses success in the fashion industry

My success is no accident. Etiam consectetur odio erat, quis mattis leo vestibulum non. Fusce ex ligula, tristique quis finibus sed, placerat sed libero. Phasellus convallis, sem ac tristique interdum, purus purus vehicula quam, ut [...]

How do you best prepare for university?

March 15th, 2016|Comments Off on How do you best prepare for university?

Focus on exam results. Etiam consectetur odio erat, quis mattis leo vestibulum non. Fusce ex ligula, tristique quis finibus sed, placerat sed libero. Phasellus convallis, sem ac tristique interdum, purus purus vehicula quam, ut fermentum [...]

Total 5 Books Found!

Over 200 resources available. Start your journey today to Join our Community!

Want to know more about the program please subscribe

Thank you for your message. It has been sent.
There was an error trying to send your message. Please try again later.